The Most Common Hiding Places for Germs

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The Most Common Hiding Places for Germs

germs on doorknob

Germs are everywhere, it’s true. Just because we can’t see them doesn’t mean they aren’t present. Here are six of the most common places germs like to hide.

  1. Hand dryers. It should come as no surprise to learn that germs are present in public restrooms…especially in hand dryers. Each time you flush a toilet, a spray of germs fly out into the air in the bathroom. This is known as toilet plume and it’s possible those germs travel into a hand dryer, only to be blasted back out into the air. Even the fancier jet dryers are bad, as they can shoot germs out into the air at a quicker rate of speed. It’s always best to stick with paper towels.
  2. More specifically, public pools. Here’s a frightening fact – a water park full of children can have up to 22 pounds of feces floating around in it. Kids carry as much as 10 grams of leftover feces in their rear ends. Due to not rinsing before getting in the pool, those leftovers rinse out into the pool…for others to swim in. While chlorine can kill some germs, it doesn’t kill everything. The best preventative method you can take while swimming is to avoid swallowing water.
  3. If there is a way to clean equipment before using it, take advantage of this opportunity. Bacteria can leap from our skin onto anything we touch, so you’ll want to clean any piece of equipment you use, especially the elliptical handles and weights.
  4. As horrifying as it sounds, it’s possible for restaurant menus to have 100 times more bacteria than a toilet seat. Many only get wiped down once a day, if even, and often with a dirty rag that has been used on other surfaces. Wash your hands after ordering your food; use an alcohol-based sanitizer as an alternative if you don’t feel like getting up and walking to the restroom just to wash your hands. Never let your silverware come into contact with a menu.
  5. Fruit wedges for drinks. Scientists have studied wedges at restaurants and have found that nearly 70% of lemons had disease-causing microbes, such as E. coli, and feces. Next time, order your tea or water with no lemon.
  6. Water fountains. Think about it – when is the last time you saw someone cleaning a water fountain? Now think of how many people come into contact with it and how often their mouths touch it. It’s always best to carry a water bottle with you.